Tips & Tutorials

Get the latest streaming video tips and read in-depth tutorials on broadcasting, live streaming, VODs, asset security and video content delivery strategies.

4 Ways on How to Make a Live Video Look Professional

4 Ways on How to Make a Live Video Look Professional

Think about today’s video viewing experience. Thanks to HD video, stereo sound, and high-pixel displays like the iPhone’s Retina feature — not to mention ever-higher bandwidth — entertainment and news video and audio is exceptionally clear, even for the lowliest smartphone or tablet.

Now, take that audience of viewers, accustomed to the very best HD video and deep stereo sound, and place them in front of a live streaming event that doesn’t have the same production values. Dark, blurry video and muffled audio won’t hold their attention, especially when you consider that online video drop off rates can run as high as 20 percent in the first 10 second of a video.

The good news for creators of live video is that even without a team of directors or a state-of-the-art video studio, it’s possible for organizations to up their game in terms of production quality. According to Jeff Irwin, customer success manager for IBM Cloud Video, a few simple fixes and some strategic and affordable equipment purchases can make any live stream look and sound better. So read on to learn how to make a live video look professional with these 4 proven methods. If you find this article useful too, be sure to check out our 5 Pro Tips for Live Video Production guide as well.


Inline Video Playback on Social Networks

Inline Video Playback on Social Networks

Looking to increase your audience? Want more eyeballs on your product launch? Larger viewership on your live event? Inline video playback on social networks, like Twitter and Facebook, can be a way to bolster your audience size.

This article describes what is inline playback on social networks, the advantages of using it, how to do inline video and the end user experience while including demos.

A lot of the use cases for inline video playback are relevant to marketing. Not all types of video marketing will want to use inline playback, though. In particular, those that are directed at lead generation. Watch our webinar on 9 Mistakes to Avoid in Your Video Marketing Strategy to get some ideas on if your content is brand awareness focused, and would benefit from inline playback, or if it’s more directed toward lead gen.


DIY Video Studio Setup on a Budget

DIY Video Studio Setup on a Budget

Once an organization decides to present streaming video on a regular basis, carving out space—and budget—for an in-house studio makes good sense. The prospect may sound daunting, but the studio doesn’t need to look like the headquarters at CNN : It can be equipped with the basics for somewhere in the $12,000-$15,000 range.

Brian Malone, CEO of video production company Malone Media, travels around the country working with companies, nonprofits and government organizations to share their messages through video. Here, he explains how with help from the IT department (and some smart hardware and software purchases), organizations can deliver streaming video on a few minutes’ notice. But first, they need a basic setup and equipment, and this article discusses approaching a DIY video studio setup while being mindful of the end budget.

If you are looking for an expanded guide on this subject, please reference our Video Studio Recommendations white paper.


Closed Captioning vs Subtitles

Closed Captioning vs Subtitles

Curious on adding text to your video content? Unsure on if you should do closed captions or subtitles, or even what the differences are between them? This article discusses what are subtitles and compares closed captioning vs subtitles to assist you on which to go with and why.


What is Closed Captioning and How Does it Work

What is Closed Captioning and How Does it Work

Wondering what is closed captioning? Curious on why you should be captioning your content, or what regulations might exist that could impact your industry?

This article describes closed captions and relates why they are important, with an emphasis on the legal side of the equation. It also includes some best practices, to ensure that content owners are creating what could be considered quality closed captions, both from an accessibility standpoint and to protect organizations as regulations tighten.


4 Live Video Analytics You Shouldn’t Ignore

4 Live Video Analytics You Shouldn't Ignore

There’s a gold mine of data in live video streams — data that can guide communications programs and help organizations refine future presentations. Important engagement clues are buried deep in the data: How long are viewers actually tuning in to company video? Are they responding to calls to action? How often are they engaging?

During any live stream, metrics are key for assessing performance, spotting trends and honing everything from a video’s message to its quality. Here are four impactful (and often overlooked) data points to collect from your live video analytics to get a complete picture of the event’s success.


Multi-CDN Enhanced by Software Defined Delivery

Multi-CDN Enhanced by Software Defined Delivery

The live streaming market continues to mature. We’ve come a long way from 1995 when RealNetworks streamed the first baseball game and when Seattle’s Paramount Theater placed the first symphony online. As that market continues to mature, the desire for improved performance has increased in tandem. One method of achieving that is moving beyond a single point of end viewer distribution. Rather than rely on a single network or CDN (content delivery network), organizations can achieve mass scale through utilizing a multi-CDN approach.

This article addresses the benefits of utilizing multiple CDNs for video delivery, use cases, an enhanced software defined approach for improved delivery and links to additional resources.

If you want to learn more about video delivery and CDNs in general, though, please read our What Is A Content Delivery Network article.


Improve Live Streaming Video Audience Engagement

Improve Live Streaming Video Audience Engagement

Wondering how to improve live streaming video audience engagement? Facebook and Twitter, texts, email, Slack, real-life meetings – just some of the many distractions that can lure viewers away from streaming video presentations such as training sessions and corporate town hall meetings.

It’s hard enough ensuring that viewers pay attention when they’re sitting around a conference table or seated in an auditorium. But if they’re not even in the same room as the presenters, how can you attract their attention over the course of the video stream? The communicators and video experts below say that by planning out every segment of streaming video, and adding valuable content to cover presenting gaps, you’ll improve the chances that audiences will stay engaged until the very end.


Video Terms Glossary: Definitions & Acronyms

Video Terms Glossary: Definitions & Acronyms

A streaming media and video terms glossary that contains definitions of acronyms, technologies and techniques. The definitions are related to live streaming, broadcasting and video hosting.

These video terms are relevant for both new techniques and legacy methods, which still have ramifications today when handling older media. There is a larger emphasis for online video applications, although a few terms which have roots in older methodology and processes. The glossary will be continuously updated as the industry evolves. Links to learn more and for relevant articles will be added overtime as well. If you are looking more for some tips on executing these terms, check out these 5 Pro Tips for Video Production.


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Avoid These 4 Live Streaming Video Mistakes

Avoid These 4 Live Streaming Video Mistakes

The live stream video begins, and the carefully prepared speaker begins addressing an audience of thousands of viewers. The presentation is going smoothly until, just a few minutes into the opening keynote, the video freezes. Some viewers sound the alert in the chat window, others try checking their own connection. But many viewers have left: On average, one in five viewers will immediately stop watching a stream with poor video quality and never return.

Most of the time, common live streaming video mistakes—poor sound quality and a broken (or unattended) chat function, among others—are easily avoided with careful advance work. Organizations new to streaming video should heed this advice from Jeff Irwin, customer success manager for IBM Cloud Video. In the process of helping customers implement and manage streaming video, Irwin has identified common mistakes that stand in the way of streaming events and their viewers.


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