All posts by Alan Drummer

Deliver internal video without bottlenecks: Know what your network requires

Internal video delivery

It’s challenging for enterprises to deliver internal video because streaming video consumes so much bandwidth.  For instance, if a 100-person company site has a 100 megabit-per-second internet connection, and just 34 people watch a live stream of CEO town hall at their desktops at the same time, they can cause a network outage.

Three main approaches solve the problem. One is unicast delivery, where a single video stream is sent from the source to an onsite unicast server, which caches the content and distributes it to hundreds or even thousands of viewers while minimizing the impact on the internet connection and network.

A second approach is multicast delivery, where a single stream from the video source is received by a specially-configured router, which addresses the video packets so that they simultaneously serve multiple viewers at a site.  Cable and telecom companies use multicasting because of its bandwidth efficiency.


Top 9 tips for live-streaming commencements and other big events: Advice from Notre Dame’s Streaming Engineer


Notre Dame’s Eric Nisly guides live-streaming of commencement and other events using resources like this production truck.

Live-streamed video takes you to the heart of an event and lets you share in its emotion from wherever you are.

Maybe a friend or family member is crossing the stage to get a diploma, or an ensemble of musicians is playing passionately to win a prestigious international prize, or a university is interviewing teachers and students during an online fundraiser to share with alumni the kind of moments that make the campus special.

These are just some of the hundreds of annual events now streamed by the University of Notre Dame. The volume of streamed events has roughly doubled in the last three years as the public’s appetite for streaming video grows.

Notre Dame’s production team, including Streaming Engineer Eric Nisly, have learned from experience a few best practices that make a big difference in keeping glitches low, emotional impact high, and results solid. We asked Eric to share 9 of his top tips.

  1. Get the word out
  2. Plan to fail
  3. Keep crew responsibilities narrow
  4. Get the two most wanted camera angles
  5. Ensure live support from your streaming platform
  6. Better than selling DVDs: stream goodwill
  7. Document success: crowdsource your streaming playbook
  8. Build strategic vendor relationships
  9. Keep raising the bar: put a point person on R&D


Preparing for failure is key to success in live video, say customers at IBM Enterprise Video Idea Exchange

Picture of IBM Cloud Video customer event in San Francisco

IBM Cloud Video customers shared best practices at a customer event in San Francisco,with more events to be staged in Singapore, Chicago, New York, and Dallas

Live video is so exciting because no one knows what will happen—and just about everything will happen, over time. Expect things to break.

This was the consensus among the customers and practitioners who attended the first IBM Cloud Video Enterprise Video Idea Exchange, on February 9 in San Francisco.

The idea for the event came from a customer on the video team at a top hospitality company. The team stages frequent internal and external broadcasts, and they wanted to talk with other IBM Cloud Video customers to identify best practices for fail-proofing live-streamed events.  The top tip, not surprisingly, was to have redundancies for every component, from internet service provider to encoder.


What can enterprise video do for your numbers?

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Live-streamed video, enabled by a cloud-based video platform, is having a big impact on the business world. That’s the conclusion of a new enterprise video guide.

One example of video’s impact, the guide notes, was at an 8,000-person financial company  with dozens of sites around the world. The company faced a sudden marketplace change, and its CEO asked employees to watch a live all-hands meeting over secured, streaming video. The executive described the company’s new strategy in the meeting, and employees got their questions answered through the video platform’s Q&A module in real time. The company pivoted in an hour, leading its field.

Another example of impact is when a global car maker used live streaming video to draw 3,400 unique viewers to a new model introduction at an auto show. The company was able to reach beyond the 300 press members in the room.

A year later, at the same auto show, the car maker streamed another model introduction and this time it included LiveAd, a service of IBM Cloud Video.  LiveAd displays streaming video in standard ad units on strategic sites. Users roll-over the ad to make the video bigger, without having to leave the site. A click makes the stream play full screen.


Mazda video case study: Driving 100x more viewers to a product launch using IBM Cloud Video

A new Mazda video case study shows how live video can achieve spectacular results.

A big hook for Mazda is the appeal of its designs. The Mazda Miata, for instance, has become  the best-selling two-seater open sports car of all time. The Mazda design philosophy is called “Soul of Motion”, and it seeks to capture “the power and elegance of a wild animal in the instant when it pounces on its prey.”

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