Tag Archives: mobile streaming

CEO Brad Hunstable to Time Magazine: “We’re Optimizing for Quality”

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As the buzz about mobile streaming video reaches a fever pitch, Time magazine’s John Patrick Pullen points out one aspect of the issue that no one’s talking about: the impact on our mobile data plans.

Highlighting that Ustream has been in the live-streaming game for more than five years, Pullen sat down with CEO Brad Hunstable to get his take on live video apps will impact the mobile data landscape.

Live-stream users should expect their data bill to reflect how they use these apps, says Ustream CEO Brad Hunstable. “If you broadcast for one minute, once to twice a week it’s not a big deal, “ he says. “But if you broadcast for an hour once or twice a day, you could have some sticker shock.”

Fortunately, Ustream already addresses the issue of bandwidth and data usage by dynamically adjusting the video feed for the network or device.

“We’re optimizing for quality in the background,” says Hunstable. “If someone is on a poor connection, we’re actually going to send them a lower quality file to make sure that it gets delivered and works, and is not choppy.” In comparison, Meerkat and Periscope only play in standard definition.

While both AT&T and Verizon have both capped their data plans, unlimited data options have thrived among other providers looking to differentiate themselves. Whether the growing popularity of mobile streaming video will force a change in the status quo is still uncertain.

“My personal opinion is that we’re in a temporary place where they charge a lot for this data consumption,” says Hunstable, who is looking forward to technologies like 5G networks to make prices more reasonable and bandwidth bigger.

Read the full article here

The Politics of Mobile Streaming

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Live mobile broadcasting was one of the hottest topics at last week’s South by Southwest event. And while live video — even mobile live video — is nothing new, conversations around its applications are springing up in several sectors, including politics.

Some pundits are holding up the latest mobile streaming video apps as political game-changers as the 2016 election season approaches. Are they right?

Not quite, says Matt Browner Hamlin in a recent article on Medium. Smart campaigners have actually been leveraging the power of live video streaming since the very beginning. Hamlin goes on to describe how he, as deputy Internet director for Christopher Dodd’s campaign way back in in 2007, Ustreamed speeches and Q&A sessions:

People following the presidential primary were able to engage in the same dialogue with a candidate as residents of the early states. Using UStream’s embedded chat functionality, as well as monitoring comments on the sites where our streams were embedded, we were able to bring in questions from people across the country into Dodd’s Q&A sessions with voters in New Hampshire and caucus-goers in Iowa.

Read the rest of Hamlin’s article here.

Ustream: Mobile Since 2009

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If you kept up with some of the discussions at South by Southwest (SXSW) this past week, you surely noticed a lot of buzz around live streaming video from mobile devices. And while some are talking about mobile streaming like it’s cutting-edge stuff, you might be surprised to learn that Ustream has been doing this for years.

Back in 2009, Ustream introduced the world’s first mobile app capable of streaming live video from the iPhone to the Internet. Almost six years later, it seems the rest of the world is finally catching up.

Since its introduction, Ustream Live Broadcaster has seen more than 15 million downloads and last year, Ustream delivered more than 75 million mobile live broadcasts.

In a recent conversation with Will Oremus of Slate magazine, Ustream CEO Brad Hunstable shared that he isn’t surprised by the sudden success of other mobile apps, nor is he worried.

And yes, he thinks casual mobile live streaming is here to stay. “It’s a different thing, like Vine versus YouTube,” he said of the difference between Meerkat and Ustream. In his view, Meerkat will bring attention to live streaming and lower the barrier to people creating videos themselves, and that will benefit the whole sector. Between the coming 5G mobile data networks and cameras that can shoot 1080p video, he said, “there are a lot of very natural forces that are pushing this industry toward an explosion.”

Not that Ustream is resting on its laurels. Earlier this week, Ustream opened its live mobile broadcasting SDK and APIs to the public, allowing any company to build a Meerkat-like or other creative live video solution and to leverage Ustream’s live video platform for immediate scalability. TechCrunch’s Kyle Russell broke the news for Ustream in this article which was shared and gained enough traction for the SDK to land on new tech product sharing site Product Hunt and gain upvotes from around the world. Click here to cast your vote. The APIs and SDK will be free for developers to use in creating and testing their applications.

So while a couple tiny startups ride the media wave from SXSW, we’ll continue to innovate on the proven, technology platform that started it all. As noted in last week’s NPR All Tech Considered article by Tajha Chappallet-Lanier, we’re delivering video solutions highly tailored to the needs of marketers, executives, HR professionals, and professional broadcasters. And, we’ll adding powerful, enterprise-class features like security, SD-CDN, eCDN and SSO that enable organizations to use business-ready video solutions.