Category Archives: Ustream in the News

Bloomberg: Ustream a “Pioneer” in Live Video

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In the recent article “Meerkat, Periscope, Been There, Done That,” Bloomberg Business contributor Olga Kharif reminded readers that new apps Meerkat and Periscope are not the first tools to enable live video streaming from smartphones — far from it.

While the new apps have attracted considerable buzz, both in the media and among consumers, Ustream ranks among the “pioneers” of streaming video, dating back to 2007. And while newcomers focus on consumers, CEO Brad Hunstable points out that Ustream has evolved to a new level, offering a secure, high-performance tool to help enterprises reach customers and employees.

Read the article here

Software-Defined CDNs: Scale and Quality at a Savings

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Ustream has earned a reputation for being able to accommodate some of the world’s largest streaming events with as many as 1 million concurrent viewers and 14 million total viewers during large events and regularly hosts 70 million viewers per month. And, while that alone is impressive, what’s more interesting is that Ustream has developed technology that meet the needs when audiences start quickly, grow quickly and then leave once the live event is over.

The solution for these problems has been seven years in the making at Ustream. It’s a unique technology we call Software Defined CDN, or SD-CDN. This blog from online video “voice of the industry” analyst and blogger, Dan Rayburn speculates on the possibilities of this technology platform as a stand-alone service or bandwidth exchange.

 

The Politics of Mobile Streaming

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Live mobile broadcasting was one of the hottest topics at last week’s South by Southwest event. And while live video — even mobile live video — is nothing new, conversations around its applications are springing up in several sectors, including politics.

Some pundits are holding up the latest mobile streaming video apps as political game-changers as the 2016 election season approaches. Are they right?

Not quite, says Matt Browner Hamlin in a recent article on Medium. Smart campaigners have actually been leveraging the power of live video streaming since the very beginning. Hamlin goes on to describe how he, as deputy Internet director for Christopher Dodd’s campaign way back in in 2007, Ustreamed speeches and Q&A sessions:

People following the presidential primary were able to engage in the same dialogue with a candidate as residents of the early states. Using UStream’s embedded chat functionality, as well as monitoring comments on the sites where our streams were embedded, we were able to bring in questions from people across the country into Dodd’s Q&A sessions with voters in New Hampshire and caucus-goers in Iowa.

Read the rest of Hamlin’s article here.

Ustream: Mobile Since 2009

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If you kept up with some of the discussions at South by Southwest (SXSW) this past week, you surely noticed a lot of buzz around live streaming video from mobile devices. And while some are talking about mobile streaming like it’s cutting-edge stuff, you might be surprised to learn that Ustream has been doing this for years.

Back in 2009, Ustream introduced the world’s first mobile app capable of streaming live video from the iPhone to the Internet. Almost six years later, it seems the rest of the world is finally catching up.

Since its introduction, Ustream Live Broadcaster has seen more than 15 million downloads and last year, Ustream delivered more than 75 million mobile live broadcasts.

In a recent conversation with Will Oremus of Slate magazine, Ustream CEO Brad Hunstable shared that he isn’t surprised by the sudden success of other mobile apps, nor is he worried.

And yes, he thinks casual mobile live streaming is here to stay. “It’s a different thing, like Vine versus YouTube,” he said of the difference between Meerkat and Ustream. In his view, Meerkat will bring attention to live streaming and lower the barrier to people creating videos themselves, and that will benefit the whole sector. Between the coming 5G mobile data networks and cameras that can shoot 1080p video, he said, “there are a lot of very natural forces that are pushing this industry toward an explosion.”

Not that Ustream is resting on its laurels. Earlier this week, Ustream opened its live mobile broadcasting SDK and APIs to the public, allowing any company to build a Meerkat-like or other creative live video solution and to leverage Ustream’s live video platform for immediate scalability. TechCrunch’s Kyle Russell broke the news for Ustream in this article which was shared and gained enough traction for the SDK to land on new tech product sharing site Product Hunt and gain upvotes from around the world. Click here to cast your vote. The APIs and SDK will be free for developers to use in creating and testing their applications.

So while a couple tiny startups ride the media wave from SXSW, we’ll continue to innovate on the proven, technology platform that started it all. As noted in last week’s NPR All Tech Considered article by Tajha Chappallet-Lanier, we’re delivering video solutions highly tailored to the needs of marketers, executives, HR professionals, and professional broadcasters. And, we’ll adding powerful, enterprise-class features like security, SD-CDN, eCDN and SSO that enable organizations to use business-ready video solutions.

Super Bowl Highlights Need for Scalable Streaming

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When the New England Patriots squared off against the Seattle Seahawks in Super Bowl XLIV, more than 1.3 million people experienced the event through NBC’s live streaming video — a 50 percent increase over last year’s online viewership.

According to NBC’s press release, the stream also set Super Bowl records for average viewers per minute (800,000), concurrent users (1.3 million) and total minutes (213 million).

While it was an impressive achievement for live streaming video, it was not without its challenges. As the game progressed, the overwhelming demand resulted in some online viewers experiencing time delays and other technical difficulties.

“NBC is great at streaming live events,” Ustream CTO Gyula Feher told The Daily Dot in an interview regarding the event. “They were the first to stream the Super Bowl in 2012. And, the Super Bowl is the ‘Everest’ of live events: Let’s remember that Super Bowl XLVIII was the most watched television event ever. It’s likely that the peak load on the NBC livestream was similarly record-breaking.”

One of the biggest challenges in streaming a live event, however, is anticipating the bandwidth required, which can vary dramatically from one minute to the next. For example, during Salesforce’s Dreamforce conference, the streams of keynote speeches by CEO Mark Benioff and Hilary Clinton drew record-setting audiences.

One way Ustream has addressed this challenge of being able to scale and anticipate required bandwidth is through a unique technology we developed called Software Defined content delivery network (CDN), or SD-CDN.

SD-CDN provides the ability to scale automatically without manual provisioning of resources, dynamically adding and removing edges and providers as demand requires. The system can leverage a combination of edge resources (e.g. CDN providers, transit lines, peering and ad-hoc edges, etc.) and instantly route traffic among those sources as needed. A built-in monitoring system evaluates in real time the performance and efficacy of each source and can make automatic adjustments as changing conditions require.

What does all this mean for the individual viewer? The best possible quality from beginning to end — and the ability to pre-empt issues that could disrupt the viewing experience.

Now that’s what we call a big win.

Learn about the best solution for your big event here.

Is 2015 “The Year of Video?”

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When that famous ball dropped in Times Square to mark the start of 2015, millions of viewers around the world had access to the event thanks to Ustream’s six-hour live streaming broadcast. It was a most appropriate beginning to what Ustream CEO Brad Hunstable is calling “The Year of Video.”

“I think 2015 will be the year of video,” Hunstable recently told the International Business Times, “so it’s sort of fitting that we bring this into the new year with this really interactive, really HD, high-quality New Year’s Eve presentation.”

So what is driving this surging interest in live streaming video? One word: business.

“The business model for Ustream has been traditionally advertising,” Hunstable said, “but what’s interesting is over the past few years we’ve really doubled down our efforts to become a SAAS [Software-as-a-Service] company. We’ll license and sell our technology to media companies and enterprises that need really powerful and highly scalable video solutions.” (Read the full article here.)

Hunstable echoed those same sentiments when he spoke with SiliconANGLE at IBM Impact 2014:

“If you look at where the growth is happening in video — most people don’t realize this — most of the growth in this next wave is going to happen within the enterprise … The enterprise is a tremendous opportunity, and what you’re going to see coming from Ustream, we’re going to continue to provide really robust solutions that solve the needs of these organizations for productivity, transparency, to connect with consumers and their employees in deeper ways … Every corporation today is a media company.”

The data supports Hunstable’s assertions: According to a recent study by The Aberdeen Group, 95 percent of Best-in-Class marketers are using video as part of their content marketing mix.

So, will 2015 be “The Year of Video?” We think so!

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Brad Hunstable to ReadWrite: “Video can really relay passion better than any medium”

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Ustream CEO Brad Hunstable recently sat down with Stephanie Chan of the tech news site ReadWrite to share the story of Ustream, what the company is like today, and where it — and live streaming video in general — is going. (Read the full article here)

Some of our favorite excerpts:brad-hunstable-readwrite

ReadWrite: What were you like growing up?

Brad Hunstable: I was definitely more of a hacker as a kid. As a pre-teen, I coded and built a Bulletin Board Service (BBS – the Internet before there was an Internet) in Texas. […] It certainly was not “cool” to be a programmer back then and the many times I was called ”geek” were not terms of endearment.
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RWCan you tell me what Ustream is like today? 

BH: Ustream is one of the largest video solutions on the Web, and we are primarily focused on enterprises. We want to help businesses communicate more effectively with their two most important constituents— customers and their employees.

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RW: Livestreaming has recently come into the media forefront with Amazon’s acquisition of livestream video gaming site, Twitch. What does this mean for the current state of livestream video?

BH: […] Video is reaching a point where it’s really becoming a foundation piece of the Internet. By 2017, according to Cisco, it will be 55% of the Internet’s traffic. It’s incredible. We did a Sony Playstation 4 launch a couple months ago, and it was 2% of the Internet’s traffic.

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RW: What’s next for you and Ustream?

BH: I’m a big believer that there’s going to be a company that can be a video layer across enterprise. Everything I’m doing today in terms of our product is really about helping businesses be more transparent to their customers, more transparent to their employees. We help them use video to build those relationships.

To read more of Brad’s insights, check out the full interview here.

Veteran Support Group, Oscar Mike Foundation, Named as Latest ‘Ustream for Change’ Honoree

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September 4, 2014 – SAN FRANCISCO — Ustream, the world’s leading live video platform, today announced veteran-focused non-profit, Oscar Mike Foundation, as the newest recipient of a ‘Ustream for Change’ award. As part of the honor, Ustream will provide Oscar Mike a complimentary license to the Ustream Enterprise Pro Broadcasting product for a period of three months, allowing the organization to put a public spotlight on the challenges and opportunities facing veterans, with topics including living with post-traumatic stress, adapting to life after combat injury and the impact on spouses and caregivers.  Oscar Mike’s series of live video discussions is titled the “After Action Panel” and can be found at  Ustream Channel, http://www.ustream.tv/AfterActionPanel Broadcasts will begin on Saturday, September 13, with the first episode covering veterans’ personal struggles with post-traumatic stress syndrome (PTSD). The panel will feature a landmark gathering of veterans representing every major conflict in the nation’s history back to World War II. “As a West Point graduate, I’m thrilled the Ustream for Change panel chose to recognize the sacrifice and dedication of our Veterans,” said Brad Hunstable, CEO and founder of Ustream. “Live video takes audience experience to the next level and so we are proud that our technology can help further bring veteran support to life for these heroes.” Launched at the start of 2014, ‘Ustream for Change’ is a philanthropic program that seeks to advance Ustream’s mission of empowering businesses and societies to be more transparent and productive through the innovative use of video. The program was originally inspired by three Ukrainian citizen journalists, whose coverage of events in Kiev captured the attention of more than 50 million viewers across the globe. More than 400 applications from every continent have been submitted since launch, with causes spanning education, civil rights, politics, and evangelism sectors.  For more information on Ustream for Change, visit http://www.ustream.tv/our-company/change “We are excited to partner with Ustream to bring these important topics more prominently into the national consciousness,” added Noah Currier, Oscar Mike president and founder. “Veterans have always made amazing sacrifices for their countries during active service. Using video to share experiences assists this process, and platforms like Ustream allow us to do this with the reach and impact of a global media organization.” Live video series for veterans will kick off Sept 13 with representatives from every major conflict since WWII   About Oscar Mike Oscar Mike exists to assist and promote disabled Veterans. The term “Oscar Mike” comes from military radio jargon used on the front lines, and translates to staying “On the Move”. Being Oscar Mike means being active, staying positive and living life to its absolute fullest. The Oscar Mike Foundation helps to rehabilitate disabled veterans and individuals through participation in high-energy extreme sporting events. A registered 501c3 non-profit organization, The Oscar Mike Foundation is comprised of a group of Veterans, athletes, artists and individuals from all walks of life who view disabilities not as roadblocks, but as challenges to own and overcome.

How a Webcam Pointed at a Police Radio Won the Internet Friday – All Things D

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 – All Things D

http://allthingsd.com/20130420/how-a-webcam-pointed-at-a-police-radio-won-the-internet-friday/

The events in Boston — starting Monday with a pair of explosions that killed three and injured 176 near the finish line of the Boston Marathon — came to a dramatic close Friday night with the capture of 19-year-old Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, one of two brothers suspected of carrying out the attacks. He had been hiding out in a boat parked in the backyard of a house in Watertown, Mass.

A furious citywide manhunt brought Boston and surrounding towns to a standstill, and there was little else to do all day but watch the live TV coverage. All day, reporters repeated what they knew, which was precious little beyond the bare facts. One suspect was dead, the other on the run after an intense gunfight with police. The “Breaking News” banners became meaningless, because throughout the day there was not much actual news breaking other than that the search continued.

Not 30 minutes after a news conference during which local officials told Boston residents they could probably go outside again, police engaged in a firefight with the suspect hiding in the boat.

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It was at this point that a quarter of a million people, including me, tuned in to the streaming video image of Uniden Bearcat scanner radio picking up publicly available police communications traffic in Boston.

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